Arrangement of the Retrieved , 2011

Objects hold history. Materials and forms hold marks and lesions that help us understand more about ourselves or the people who used the object. I am thinking about how the materials and objects we use define us as a society and what our modern objects will look like as relics in the future? What histories will be gleaned by the appearances of our objects?

I wanted to capture an architectural element, not as a familiar object but as a relic. These 4 sculptures are based on modern copies of roman columns, which are not the same as an authentic roman column because there is always some factor of pastiche that finds its way into the design(especially the copies that we see in the aisles of large hardware stores or global chains such as Ikea). The materials I used to create these 4 sculptures are also plasticated materials that I imagine will not disintegrate, but will consume themselves in a similar way that barnacles attach and cling to objects below the sea. The metaphorical significance of a barnacle is rendered through the texture in Arrangement of the Retrieved.

Foam, paint, glue
120 in x 18 in x 16 in (approx.)
305 cm x 45.7 cm x 40.6 cm (approx.)



Installation view Photo credit: Bárbara Soto Domingo





Detail Photo credit: Bárbara Soto Domingo





Detail Photo credit: Bárbara Soto Domingo





Installation view





Installation view Photo credit: Bárbara Soto Domingo





Detail Photo credit: Bárbara Soto Domingo